Paul Ryan Wants Business As Usual vs Trump Republicans Who Want To Get Things Done

Republicans, particularly conservative Republicans, are none too happy with the recent RyanCare debacle that offered up a version of Obamacare-light but did nothing to actually allow free market powers to reduce the cost of healthcare, increase choice, and free Americans from the disastrous burdens imposed on them by the Obama regime.

Ryan had years to prepare an alternative. He wasn’t ready. Or, he didn’t care. Either way, his list of supporters has grown shorter and his enemies much-much longer of late.

Trump White House operatives, led by Vice President Mike Pence, have been dispatched to Congress to try and cobble together revisions that might save the bill and thus, keep Obamacare in place. Globalist pro-insurance company advocates like Senator Lindsey Graham are already rubbing their hands together, delighted to see the move to repeal and replace Obamacare (something they never really wanted to see happen) now floundering.

The primary issues with RyanCare are that it leaves in place a pile of federal government regulations, and continues to restrict true free market solutions which mean higher cost and less choice. Many Republicans are already looking at the 2018 Midterms and not wanting to engage in a political battle they fear will cost them votes. This has been the excuse of Republicans for years now, running on promises they have no intention of keeping, and they are increasingly unhappy with pressure from President Trump, a political outsider they despised since day one, to actually work to get things done.

On the Trump side are Republicans in states that overwhelmingly voted Trump and who fear voter backlash during those same Midterms who are angry that Ryan put them in this position in the first place.

Publicly, President Trump has been supportive of Ryan’s efforts. Inside the Oval, it is said things are not nearly so cordial between the two men. Trump wants results. Ryan wants to avoid real conflict with Democrats.

The next six months will likely determine who emerges victorious in this battle of do much vs do little.

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